PHILANTHROPY AND THE NWRCT: GIVING IS FELT MOST DEEPLY DURING THE CHRISTMAS SEASON

by | Jan 1, 2024 | Altruism

At no time of the year is want at its highest peak than during the Christmas holidays. There’s so much pressure to spend on gifts, so much commercialism, everywhere you turn, and that becomes that much more pronounced during tougher times, as we all saw in 2023. That explains the emptier stores on retail strips like Bloor St. W., that was apparent Boxing Day. We all see it on the news. Philanthropy is a way for affluent individuals to make a difference, to give out blessings, creating a positive impact on their respective communities.

The Native Women’s Resource Centre of Toronto (NWRCT), based in Toronto’s downtown, supports thousands of Indigenous women and their families in the Greater Toronto Area. Their programs include offering wrap-around blanket services to address and support basic needs, housing (reducing and preventing homelessness, referrals, provision of resources, furniture, hygiene products).

Philanthropy: Christmas gift-giving program

They benefit families (like the Pimaatisiwin Program, promoting the healthy development of children 0-6 years of age, and family support programs that’s all about the stabilization of families), advocacy. And they focus on employment (including programs that assist Indigenous women in building their economic independence through employment training, developing goals, small business supports).

This Christmas, donors and philanthropists stepped up with Christmas gifts for women in NWRCT’s annual Winter Solstice – so people there could also experience the holiday tradition of gift-giving. It was all about encouraging a spirit of giving, love and unity, creating cherished memories for all who attended. The emotional value there is immeasurable. The NWRCT wants to acknowledge their donors, such as RBC and the Dawn Adams Gift Box Program.

Philanthropy

A safe place to go for Indigenous women and children, especially during the holiday season

NWRCT programs include offering wrap-around blanket services to address and support basic needs, housing (reducing and preventing homelessness, referrals, provision of resources, furniture, hygiene products). They benefit families (like the Pimaatisiwin Program, promoting the healthy development of children 0-6 years of age, and family support programs that’s all about the stabilization of families), advocacy. And they focus on employment (including programs that assist Indigenous women in building their economic independence through employment training, developing goals, small business supports).

The NWRCT also focuses on education (communication, numeracy, interpersonal and digital skills). People go there to heal from trauma (their community wellness program is focused on reducing family violence, and the Trauma Support program creates innovative approaches to support survivors of sexual violence, harassment and human trafficking). They focus on access to ceremonies and traditional practitioners/healers.

Overall the NWRCT aims to build confidence and capacity within the collective community. They host a variety of cultural activities for their clients and the general public. That includes the Minaake Awards, Sisters In Spirit Vigil, and Winter Solstice.

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